Using the toilet

Some people who are weak or unsteady immediately after returning home arrange to rent a bedside commode (a chair outfitted with a bedpan) for a few days or weeks. This should be sturdy enough to bear your full weight and have non-skid legs.

  • A raised toilet seat with arms may be helpful for those using their own bathrooms. The device fits over your existing toilet seat and is designed to make sitting down and getting up from the toilet easier before you’re allowed to bear full weight on your new ankle joint.Keep your ankle precautions in mind at all times.
  • Back up to the toilet seat until you feel it touching the backs of your knees.
  • Keep one hand on your cane or walker while you reach back with the other hand for the edge of the raised toilet seat. If your seat has arms, reach back for them with both hands.
  • Keep your operated leg out in front of you so it doesn’t take any weight. Sit down, resting your foot lightly on the floor.

When it’s time to get up, reverse the process:

Place one hand on your cane or walker and the other on the edge of the raised toilet seat. Push yourself up using the arms of the toilet seat and keeping your operated leg out in front of you until you are standing. Be sure to get your balance before taking hold of your cane or walker.